Monday, 27 January 2020

Operational Resilience


By Shirley Beglinger, Advisory Board Member, Crescendo Advisors

In today's interconnected financial world, "organisational resilience" must be taken to mean much more than just "a fully tested disaster recovery plan". Regulators are requiring boards to see beyond the walls of their own firm and identify its position in the economic, IT and service-delivery ecosystem with an emphasis on important services provided. This is a completely different perspective on risk.  Boards and CROs need to reconsider many tried and tested risk methodologies and metrics.

In reviewing the drivers of potential operational disruption, the CRO may identify several which are difficult or expensive to address. "Reliance on legacy infrastructure" for example will likely lead to a lengthy boardroom discussion of the expense and dangers of IT integration projects. Supply chains and data sharing quickly lead to the realisation that even if the firm's own arrangements are top-notch, there are probably other firms in their ecosystem who may not have the same level of preparedness.

Having identified potential sources of disruption, the board must then quantify potential costs (internal and external) and assess the ability to recover from severe and plausible scenarios of operational disruption and compare these with the firm's stated tolerance for operational disruption. Where necessary, remediation plans must be put in place.

While no board member wishes to explain to the regulator why their firm was the first domino in the ecosystem to fall over, such far-reaching change needs to be carefully managed.  To implement these requirements firms will benefit from a pilot that enables them to develop an understanding of the steps that would be required.  This will be less disruptive and more beneficial than a firm-wide initiative.

However, the need to scale up means that firms will need to identify or acquire in-house "resilience capabilities". A key aspect of the output from a successful pilot project would be to identify exactly what capabilities are required and how they can best be embedded within the firm's business.

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